Lisbon Studies

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Integrated members

Helder Carita

Helder Carita
PI – Nuclear CV

Isabel Mendonça

Isabel Mendonça
Nuclear CV

Raquel Henriques da Silva

Raquel Henriques da Silva
Nuclear CV

Joana Cunha Leal

Joana Cunha Leal

Maria João Pereira Coutinho

Paulo Oliveira Ramos

Paulo Oliveira Ramos

Pedro Flor

Pedro Flor

Sílvia Ferreira

Sílvia Ferreira

Susana Varela Flor

Susana Varela Flor

Other collaborators

 António Miranda  Edite Alberto  Hélia Silva  Joana Alegria  Maria Teresa Bispo
 Mariana Carrolo  Mariana Schedel  Miguel Figueira de Faria

Description

The creation of a research group dedicated to Lisbon’s history and its heritage followed the pioneering studies of José-Augusto França in FCSH. In parallel with this academic tradition, LxSt (Lisbon Studies) has an ongoing collaboration with several departments of the Municipality of Lisbon (CML), which enhances one of the strategic lines of the IHA, aimed at linking Basic and Applied Research.
The most distinctive aspect of LxSt is the diversity of the scientific profiles of  its researchers, that integrate simultaneously other research groups within the IHA, thus assuming the multifaceted character of the studies about a city with an historic, urban and artistic heritage of the utmost importance in European history.
The studies conducted by the researchers of LxSt are fundamental to the knowledge of the city in its historical dimension. Among the different research areas now being developed around funded projects we should mention the following:
(1)  The team structured around the project “Lisbon in tiles before 1755 Earthquake” (PTDC/EAT-EAT/099160/2008), under the coordination of Pedro Flor, based on the art-historical and laboratory study of the tile panel known as the “great panorama of Lisbon”, a masterpiece of Portuguese art, executed between 1699-1700. Approved for funding in 2010, this multidisciplinary project enabled the establishment of strong links with Portuguese scientific community specialized in themes related with Lisbon, namely DGPC, through the National Tile Museum, and various services of CML.
(2)  The members of the I&D project “The manor house in Lisboa and Rio de Janeiro (17th., 18th. and 19th. centuries). An inside view” (PTDC/EAT-HAT/112229/2009), whose PI is Isabel Mendonça. The research is focused on the evolution of interiors in the residences of the nobility and high aristocracy in two important regions of the Portuguese artistic world – Lisboa and Rio de Janeiro. The group integrates portuguese and brasilian art historians and architects, professionally linked with art foundations, art schools, universities and museums with important decorative arts collections.
(3)  The group structured around the project entitled “From the sacred to the secular city” (PTDC/CPC-HAT/4703/2012), whose PI is Raquel Henriques da Silva. This project and its team, consisting of researchers from various fields (history, art history, architecture and geography), explore and enhance the institutional and scientific links established with CML, in order to understand the urban evolution of the city in the perspective of its heritage valuation and to support the decisions about the future of important buildings, that were convents until 1834 and later on became hospitals, schools, barracks or factories, being today, in 2013, disused by the State.
In spite of specific approaches, the teams of the above mentioned projects articulate objectives and strategies, as they have the same partners: DGPC, The National Archives / Torre do Tombo and various services of CML, where some integrated members of LxSt work and coordinate research fellows, hired under these projects. A good example of the cooperation between researchers from IHA and preservation actions undertaken by CML is the partnership established under the Program for Research and Protection of Tiles from Lisbon (PISAL).
In addition to the members of the above mentioned projects, the group LxSt counts with other researchers, experts in urban history of Lisbon, especially in the sixteenth century (when Lisbon was a model for other port cities of the Portuguese empire in Brazil and India), and in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, in themes related to the rebuilding of Lisbon after the 1755 earthquake.
Finally the group integrates specialists in the decorative arts, an important aspect of Lisbon architecture, in a broad chronology that extends from the fifteenth century to the present times.